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If You Lived at the Time of the American Revolution (If You)

More Information at American Revolution in Depth

What I Learned Section 1 -- Answer the Following Questions:
1. At the time of the American Revolution there were thirteen American Colonies. Name them.

New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia.
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2. What happened on April 19, 1775?
The American Revolution began when the British army and Colonial militia fought at Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts.
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3. True or False: The American Revolution was fought mainly between the American colonies and Britain.
True.
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4. Did children attend school during the American Revolution?
Yes.
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5. Name ONE of the methods used to spread the news during the American Revolution.
Messengers, Newspapers, Town Criers, Pamphlets and Books, or Broadsides.
Read more

6. What happened on October 19, 1781?
The British Army surrendered to the Continental Army in Yorktown, Virginia.
Read more

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What I Learned Section 2 -- Define the following words:
Stamp Act: British law passed in 1765, requiring the American colonists to pay extra money for a special stamp on all printed products, including newspapers, land deeds, card games, dice games, and graduation diplomas.

Boston Tea Party: On December 16, 1773, American Patriots dressed as Mohawk Indians and dumped 342 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest the British tax on tea.

Continental Congress: Federal legislature of the American colonies. The First Continental Congress first met in Carpenters' Hall in Philadelphia in September, 1774, and the Second Continental Congress first met in Philadelphia in May, 1775.

Declaration of Independence: A document signed by the Second Continental Congress in 1776, which listed twenty-seven ways King George III had hurt the colonies; Thomas Jefferson was the primary author.

Common Sense: A 47-page pamphlet written by Thomas Paine which sent the idea of freedom throughout the American colonies when it was published in January, 1776; the last page states, "THE FREE AND INDEPENDENT STATES OF AMERICA."

E Pluribus Unum: A Latin phrase meaning "one out of many."

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Bonus Questions (Answer 1 of the Following Questions for Your FREE Bookmark):
a. Who were the Patriots?
People who wanted the colonies to be independent from British rule.
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b. Who were the Loyalists?
People who wanted to remain citizens of Britain.
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c. Define ONE of the following words or expressions:
"Put your John Hancock on paper"
"Cowboy"
"Skinners"
"Big Wig"
"The Yankee's Return from Camp"
Answers will vary. Read more

d. Name ONE of the Patriots mentioned in this book and describe one of his or her accomplishments.
George Washington
Patrick Henry
Paul Revere
John Adams
Ben Franklin
Thomas Jefferson
Marquis de Lafayette
Nathan Hale
Crispus Attucks
James Otis
Abigail Adams
Mercy Otis Warren
Phillis Wheatley
Deborah Sampson
Read more

e. Name ONE of the Loyalists mentioned in this book and describe one of his or her accomplishments.
William Franklin
John Singleton Copley
Joseph Galloway
Dr. Benjamin Church
Thomas Hutchinson
Flora MacDonald
Read more

f. Use five of the words in Section 2 in a sentence.
Answers will vary.
Read more

g. Have a parent or friend give you a spelling test with EACH of the words in Section 2.

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More Valuable Information about the American Revolution:
IMA Hero™ American Revolution History
IMA Hero™ American Revolution Bookstore
IMA Hero™ American Revolution Links
IMA Hero™ Constitution of the United States Links
IMA Hero™ Declaration of Independence Links
IMA Hero™ Government & Washington, D.C. Links
American Revolution Website for the National Park Service
People of the Revolution (NPS)
Battlefields of the Revolution (NPS)
Places of the Revolution (NPS)
Links on the Revolution or Colonial America (NPS)
The Story of Molly Pitcher (Fort Sill, Oklahoma)

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If You Traveled West in a Covered Wagon (If You)

More Information at Traveled West in a Covered Wagon in Depth

What I Learned Section 1 -- Answer the Following Questions:
1. Which present-day states make up the Oregon Territory?

Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and parts of Montana and Wyoming.
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2. True or False: A covered wagon's front wheels are smaller than its back wheels.
True.
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3. Describe how ONE of the following affected the wagon train's trip:
Mud
Dust
Sickness
Answers will vary.
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4. Name ONE of the Native American tribes on the Plains.
Blackfoot, Cheyenne, Pawnee, Crow, Sioux, Bannock, and Shoshone.
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5. Did the children attend formal schools while on the wagon train?
No.
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6. How was news sent to pioneers on the wagon train?
People could send letters by supply wagons to a fort along the trail, and the pioneers would pick it up.
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7. Name ONE of the landmarks along the Oregon Trail.
Chimney Rock
Independence Rock
Soda Springs
Steamboat Springs
Devils' Backbone
Read more

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What I Learned Section 2 -- Define the following words:
Prairie Schooner: Covered wagon

Wagon Train: Group of covered wagons traveling together on the long trip west

Trail Guide: A person who previously made the trip west who was hired to guide a wagon train

Pioneers: First group of travelers who moved to the new land and made a new home

Scows: Large flat boats used to take the wagons across the Missouri River

Continental Divide: Imaginary line along the top of the Rocky Mountains from north to south marking the line where the rivers in the United States flow in opposite directions.

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Bonus Questions (Answer 1 of the Following Questions for Your FREE Bookmark):
a. Describe a typical wagon train trip.
Answers will vary.
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b. Describe a typical day on a wagon train trip.
Answers will vary.
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c. Describe the clothes of a typical person in a wagon train.
Answers will vary.
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d. Use five of the words in Section 2 in a sentence.
Answers will vary.
Read more

e. Have a parent or friend give you a spelling test with EACH of the words in Section 2.

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More Valuable Information about Traveling West in a Covered Wagon:
Oregon National Historic Trail (NPS)
Fort Laramie National Historic Site (NPS)
Chimney Rock National Historic Site (NPS)
Whitman Mission National Historic Site (NPS)
In Search of the Oregon Trail (PBS)
Oregon-California Trails Association
End of the Oregon Trail
The Oregon-Trail (Idaho State University)

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If You Lived at the Time of the Civil War (If You)

More Information at American Civil War in Depth

What I Learned Section 1 -- Answer the Following Questions:
1. Which states seceded from the Union in 1860 and 1861?

South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Texas, Virginia, Arkansas, North Carolina, and Tennessee.
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2. What happened on April 12, 1861?
The Civil War began at Fort Sumter, South Carolina.
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3. Was the Northern Army referred to as the Union Army or the Confederate Army?
Union Army. Read more

4. Was the Southern Army referred to as the Union Army or the Confederate Army?
Confederate Army.
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5. True or False: During the Civil War, children in the North had more opportunities to attend school than children in the South.
True.
Read more

6. How was the news spread from the front lines?
Letters, Newspapers, and Magazines.
Read more

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What I Learned Section 2 -- Define the following words:
Secede: Leave

Plantation: Large farm

Confederacy: A group of states working together but allowing each state to keep its own laws

54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry: First African-American regiment

Underground Railroad: A secret route to travel from the South and slavery to the North and freedom

Emancipation Proclamation: Document signed by President Abraham Lincoln on January 1, 1863, which freed the slaves in the South

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Bonus Questions (Answer 1 of the Following Questions for Your FREE Bookmark):
a. Compare the life in the North and the South during the Civil War.
Answers will vary.
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b. Compare the life in the North and the South after the Civil War.
Answers will vary.
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c. Describe ONE of the following people from the North:
Abraham Lincoln
Ulysses S. Grant
William T. Sherman
George B. McClellan
Ambrose Burnside
George Meade
Sojourner Truth
Frederick Douglass
Robert Gould Shaw
Harriet Beecher Stowe
Mathew Brady
Thomas Nast
Dorothea Dix
Clara Barton
Dr. Mary Walker
Harriet Tubman
Answers will vary.
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d. Describe ONE of the following people from the South.
Jefferson Davis
Robert E. Lee
Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson
Jeb Stuart
James Longstreet
A.P. Hill
John Mosby
Nathan Bedford Forrest
Answers will vary.
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e. During and after the Civil War new words were used. Define the origin of ONE of the following words:
Sideburns
Greenbacks
Bummers
Mailman
Shampoo
Chignon
Dixie
Mason-Dixon Line
Dix
Scalawags
Carpetbaggers
Answers will vary.
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f. Use five of the words in Section 2 in a sentence.
Answers will vary.
Read more

g. Have a parent or friend give you a spelling test with EACH of the words in Section 2.

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More Valuable Information about the American Civil War:
IMA Hero™ Civil War History
IMA Hero™ Abe Lincoln Hero History
IMA Hero™ Robert E. Lee Hero History
IMA Hero™ Ulysses S. Grant Hero History
IMA Hero™ Civil War Photos
IMA Hero™ Civil War Links
Antietam National Battlefield
Appomattox Court House National Historical Park
Fort Sumter National Monument
Gettysburg National Military Park
The Civil War Home Page

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If You Lived at the Time of Martin Luther King (If You)

More Information at Civil Rights Movement

What I Learned Section 1 -- Answer the Following Questions:
1. Which of the following public places were affected by segregation laws during the 1950's and 1960's:
a) Schools
b) Restaurants
c) Water Fountains
d) Hospitals
e) All of the above
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2. True or False: Before 1954, it was legal for public schools to be segregated.
True.
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3. Describe ONE of the following people:
Martin Luther King, Jr.
Rosa Parks
A. Philip Randolph
Thurgood Marshall
Malcolm X
Coretta Scott King
James Meredith
Reverend Jesse Jackson
John F. Kennedy
Robert F. Kennedy
Answers will vary.
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4. Name the state in which each city is located.
Birmingham, Alabama
Greensboro, North Carolina
Jackson, Mississippi
Little Rock, Arkansas
Montgomery, Alabama
Selma, Alabama
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5. Define ONE of the following marches or protests:
Montgomery Bus Boycott (1955-1956): African-Americans refused to ride the city buses in Montgomery, Alabama, for over one year as a protest of the segregation laws.
Read more

Greensboro Sit-In (1960): Four African-American students sat at a Woolworth's lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina, to protest segregated lunch counters. Read more

Freedom Rides of 1961: Bus rides throughout the South which eventually made the South obey the integration laws of buses and bus stations. Read more

March on Washington (1963): The largest Civil Rights demonstration to protest discrimination which occurred on August 28, 1963. Read more

March from Selma to Montgomery (1965): A 54-mile march from Selma to Montgomery to petition for voting rights. Read more

6. How did the news of the Civil Rights Movement spread throughout the country?
By word of mouth, listening to speeches, reading newspapers and magazines, and watching television.
Read more

7. What month is Martin Luther King, Jr.'s birthday celebrated?
January.
Read more

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What I Learned Section 2 -- Define the following words:
Civil Rights Movement: The fight for freedom and equality for African-Americans during the 1950's and 1960's

Segregation Laws: Laws set up to separate people based on race

Sit-in: Nonviolent form of protesting racial segregation in which people peacefully sit in public places where segregation laws prohibit them to sit. For example, African-Americans peacefully sitting at a lunch counter in a public restaurant.

Attorney General: The chief lawyer for the United States government

Civil Disobedience: Peacefully refusing to obey a law believed to be wrong, evil, or unjust

Freedom Singers: A group of singers traveling around the country and singing in concerts to raise money for the Civil Rights Movement

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Bonus Questions (Answer 1 of the Following Questions for Your FREE Bookmark):
a. Compare segregation in the South with segregation in the North.
In the South, public places were segregated by law, and in the North they were not
. Read more

b. What are the words to the song "We Shall Overcome?"
We shall overcome,
We shall overcome,
We shall overcome some day,
Oh, deep in my heart I do believe
We shall overcome some day.
Read more

c. Describe the significance of ONE of the following U.S. Supreme Court cases or U.S. laws:
Plessy v. Ferguson (1896): U.S. Supreme Court case holding "separate but equal" is constitutional.

Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas (1954): U.S. Supreme Court case holding segregation in public schools is unconstitutional.

Civil Rights Act (1964): Federal law protecting civil rights based on race, including desegregation of public places.

Voting Rights Act (1965): Federal law protecting the right to vote for people of all races.
Read more

d. What do the following acronyms stand for:
NAACP: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People
CORE: Congress of Racial Equality
SCLC: Southern Christian Leadership Conference
SNCC: Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee
Read more

e. Use five of the words in Section 2 in a sentence.
Answers will vary.
Read more

f. Have a parent or friend give you a spelling test with EACH of the words in Section 2.

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More Valuable Information about the Civil Rights Movement:
IMA Hero™ Martin Luther King In-Depth History
IMA Hero™ Rosa Parks In-Depth History
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)
National Civil Rights Museum
Martin Luther King, Jr. & the Civil Rights Movement Photo Gallery (Seattle Times)
The African-American World (PBS)
Encyclopedia Britannica Guide to Black History
World Book Encyclopedia: The African American Journey
Martin Luther King, Jr. Papers Project at Stanford University
Martin Luther King's Letter from Birmingham Jail

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