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May 28, 2001:
Did you know Memorial Day was first celebrated in 1868?
Yes, Memorial Day was first celebrated in the United States on May 30, 1868, to honor the soldiers killed in during the American Civil War by decorating their graves with flowers and flags. It was originally called Decoration Day and was celebrated every May 30. In 1882, the name was changed from Declaration Day to Memorial Day, and in 1971, Memorial Day was declared a national holiday to be held on the last Monday in May. Today, Memorial Day honors all men and women of the U.S. armed services who have been killed in wartime. It is tradition to have parades, speeches, and ceremonies.
Photo: Cemetery in Lexington, Virginia, on Memorial Day lined with American Flags.

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May 21, 2001:
Did you know Galileo was born the same year Michelangelo died -- 1564?
Yes, not only was it the same year, it was almost the same day! Galileo was born on February 15, and Michelangelo died just three days later on February 18. They both lived during the Renaissance which swept through Europe from the 1400's to the 1600's. The Renaissance was a "rebirth" of painting, sculpting, literature, architecture, and science.
Galileo Galilei was an Italian astronomer who changed the way we look at the universe through his discoveries of Jupiter's moon, the rings of Saturn, the phases of Venus, and sunspots. Read a book about Galileo.
Michelangelo Bounarroti was an Italian sculptor, painter, and architect. He is well known for his 16-foot-high marble sculpture of David and the painting of the ceiling in the Sistine Chapel in St. Peter's Cathedral in Rome while lying on his back. Read a book about Michelangelo.
Photos: Michelangelo (left), Galileo (right)

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May 14, 2001:
Did you know the Sojourner Rover was named after Sojourner Truth?
Yes, when the Mars Pathfinder landed on Mars on July 4, 1997, its rover was named the Sojourner Rover after the abolitionist and champion of women's rights, Sojourner Truth. NASA chose the name Sojourner (which means "traveler") after a year-long world-wide essay competition among 3,500 students. In their essays, the students explained how the heroine's traits related to the exploration of Mars. The winner was Valerie Ambroise, age 12. The other names considered for the rover were: Marie Curie (chemist), Judith Resnik (astronaut), Sacagawea (guide and interpreter), Harriet Tubman (abolitionist and Underground Railroad conductor), and Amelia Earhart (aviator). Read a book about Sojourner Truth…

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May 7, 2001:
Did you know Florence Nightingale was known as "The Lady with the Lamp?"
Yes, in 1854, Florence Nightingale went to the Crimea (near Turkey) to care for wounded soldiers in the Crimean War. She was kind and gentle, and she brought hope to the soldiers. Florence could not visit all the men during the day, and she continued her rounds at night by using a lamp to light her way. The wounded men knew she was coming by the light from the lamp she carried. Because of this, Florence became known as "The Lady with the Lamp." The men would kiss her shadow on the walls as she walked passed them. Read a book about Florence.

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April 30, 2001:
Did you know Abe Lincoln was the first Republican President?
Yes, the Republican Party was a newly formed political party when Abe Lincoln joined in 1856. In 1860, Abe was elected the 16th President of the United States, and he became the first Republican President. The Republican Party's objective at that time was to contain slavery to the Southern states and preserve the Union. Read a book about Abe…

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April 23, 2001:
Did you know Ulysses was the first person to become a Four Star General in the U.S. Army?
Yes, when the American Civil War began in 1861, Ulysses S. Grant was a Brigadier General in command of the 21st Illinois Volunteers. After winning decisive victories at Forts Henry and Donelson, Shiloh, and Vicksburg, Ulysses was promoted to Lieutenant General. On March 12, 1864, he was appointed General in Chief of the Armies of the United States and was in charge of winning the war for the Union (which he did). In 1866, a year after the Civil War ended, Ulysses was promoted to a Four Star General. This was a new military rank, and Ulysses was the first person promoted to a Four Star General. Ulysses also served as Secretary of War under President Johnson from 1867 to 1868 (when he was elected President). Read more…

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April 16, 2001:
Did you know William Shakespeare created over 2,000 words and phrases in the English language?
Yes, William Shakespeare influenced the English language more than any other writer in the world. In addition to his amazing plays and poems, he created over 2,000 new words and phrases in the English language. They include: bedroom, critic, tardiness, eyeball, freezing, silliness, laughing stock, day's work, bump, shipwrecked, priceless, partner, cheap, catlike, love-letter, tongue-tied, as luck would have it, send him packing, led a charmed life, laughed yourself into stitches, budge an inch, lie low, played fast and loose, the truth were known, vanish into thin air, and seen better days. Read More…

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April 9, 2001:
Did you know the North and the South sometimes refered to the same battle by different names during the American Civil War?
Yes, the North named the battles after a nearby river or stream, and the South named the battles after the nearest towns. For example, a battle occured on July 21, 1861, in Northern Virginia. The North called this the Battle of Bull Run and the South called this the Battle of Manassas. Here are more examples: Battle of Antietam or Sharpsburg (in Maryland), the Battle of Shiloh or Pittsburg Landing (in Tennessee), and the Battle of Stones River or Murfreesboro (in Tennesee).
Read More about the Civil War…

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April 2, 2001:
Did you know Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart asked Marie Antoinette to marry him when he was a boy?
Yes, in 1762, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and his family went on their first concert tour of Europe. Wolfgang was 6 years old. In Vienna, Wolfgang and his sister, Nannerl, performed for the Emperor and Empress of the Austrian Empire. The Empress' six year old daughter was Marie Antoinette, and Wolfgang jokingly asked her to marry him. Marie Antoinette said no, of course, and later became the Queen of France Read More…

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March 26, 2001:
Did you know Florence Nightingale met Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell, the first woman doctor in the United States?
Yes, Florence Nightingale met Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell, and Florence learned a lot from Dr. Blackwell about women achieving great things. Elizabeth was born in England and grew up in the United States. When Elizabeth was 24 years old, she decided to become a doctor. Elizabeth graduated at the top of her class from Geneva Medical College in New York, and she opened a hospital staffed by women doctors and started a medical school for women. Read More…

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March 19, 2001:
Did you know Sacagawea was given the right to vote by the Lewis and Clark Expedition during the winter of 1805-06?
Yes, the Lewis and Clark Expedition spent the winter of 1805-06 on the west coast. Before they build their fort, however, they had to decide if they would stay on the Pacific Ocean or up the Columbia River. On November 24, 1805, Captains Lewis and Clark put the decision to a vote. The men and Sacagawea voted. This is the first time a woman was given the opportunity to vote. It would be over another 100 years before women in the United States were given the right to vote in the 19th Amendment. Read More…

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March 12, 2001:
Did you know Ben Franklin helped organize the first public library in America?
Yes, in 1727, Ben organized the Leather Apron Club or Junto in Philadelphia. A Leather Apron Man was a man who wore a leather apron when he worked, like a shoemaker, a blacksmith, or a silversmith. The Leather Apron Club met every Friday night to share their ideas on different subjects. Its purpose was to further the education and business successes of young men. The members shared their ideas, papers, and books with each other. In 1731, they combined their books and started the first public circulating library in America. Read More…

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March 5, 2001:
Did you know Robert E. Lee's father was a close friend of George Washington?
Yes, Robert E. Lee's father was General Henry "Light Horse Harry" Lee. Light Horse Harry was an American Revolutionary War hero. He was with General George Washington when the British surrendered at Yorktown, Virginia, in 1781. Light Horse Harry spoke at George Washington's funeral and described Washington as "first in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen." Read More about the Revolutionary War.

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February 26, 2001:
Did you know Frederick Douglass was born Frederick Baily?
Yes, Frederick Douglass was born Frederick Baily in February, 1818. Frederick was born a slave on the Eastern Shore in Maryland. At age 20, he escaped north and went to New York City. Frederick decided to change his name to make it more difficult for slave catchers to find him. He changed his name to Frederick Douglass based on a character in the novel, The Lady of the Lake, by Sir Walter Scott. Douglass is spelled with two "s" at the end. Read a book about Frederick Douglass.

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February 19, 2001:
Did you know teddy bears got their name from President Theodore Roosevelt?
Yes, in November, 1902, President
Theodore Roosevelt went on a hunting trip in Mississippi. The other members of the hunting party tied a bear to a tree for President Roosevelt to shoot, but Roosevelt refused to shoot the helpless bear. The next day, political cartoonist Clifford Berryman, drew a cartoon showing President Roosevelt refusing to hurt the bear. From this event, stuffed teddy bears were made and called "Teddy's Bears." Read about the History of the Teddy Bear.

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February 12, 2001:
Did you know Abe Lincoln earned the nickname "Honest Abe" after he paid off his debts when his store went bankrupt?
Yes, Abe and his partner opened up a store together. Unfortunately, Abe's partner d
ied and the store went bankrupt. Abe was not required to pay off any of the store's debts. However, Abe worked hard and paid off all the debts. Afterwards, people began calling him "Honest Abe."

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February 5, 2001:
Did you know
Wolfgang A. Mozart was only 9 years old when he composed his first symphony?

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