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2003 | Apr-Dec, 2002 | Jan-Mar, 2002 | Sep-Dec, 2001 | Jun-Aug, 2001 | Feb-May, 2001

 

 
December, 2002:
"Preparation, I have often said, is rightly two-thirds of any venture." -- Amelia Earhart. Amelia Earhart was born in Atchison, Kansas, on July 24, 1897. She was the first woman to cross the Atlantic Ocean by plane, the second person and first woman to make a nonstop solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean, the first person to fly from Hawaii to California, the first person to make a solo flight across both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, and the first person to fly solo from Los Angeles to Mexico City.
>>Read about Amelia Earhart
>>Read about other Women in History

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November, 2002:
"Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth upon this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal...We here highly resolve that the dead shall not have died in vain, that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom; and that government of the people, by the people, and for the people, shall not perish from the earth." A portion of the Gettysburg Address delivered by Abraham Lincoln on November 19, 1863.
>>Read the entire Gettysburg Address
>>Read about Abe Lincoln
>>Read about the times in which Abe Lincoln lived
>>Browse Abe Lincoln's Books
>>View Photos of Abe Lincoln

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October, 2002:
"If anyone were to ask me what I want out of life I would say -- the opportunity for doing something useful, for in no other way, I am convinced, can true happiness be attained." -- Eleanor Roosevelt.
Eleanor Roosevelt was born in New York City on October 11, 1884. Her parents were Anna Hall and Elliot Roosevelt. Did you know Theodore Roosevelt (the 26th U.S. President) was Eleanor's uncle? Eleanor's father was the younger brother of Theodore.
>>Read about Eleanor Roosevelt
>>Visit Eleanor Roosevelt Links
>>View Photos of the Roosevelts

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September, 2002:
"Here is a paper with which, if I cannot whip Bobby Lee, I will be willing to go home." -- Union Major General George B. McClellan's statement upon finding Robert E. Lee's Special Order No. 191 in September, 1862. Special Order No. 191 ordered the Confederate Army to split into two divisions during its invasion into Maryland. With this knowledge, McClellan believed he could find and defeat the Confederate Army. The two armies met at the Battle of Antietam on September 17, and the battle ended in a draw. Months later, McClellan was replaced as Commander of the Union Army.
>>Read about Special Order No. 191
>>Read about the Civil War
>>Visit our American Civil War Links
>>Visit Antietam National Battlefield
>>View a Map of the Battlefield

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August, 2002:
"Arbor Day which has already transplanted itself to every state in the American Union and has even been adopted in foreign lands... is not like other holidays. Each of those reposes on the past, while Arbor Day proposes for the future." - J. Sterling Morton (1832-1903). In 1854, Morton moved to Nebraska. He planted trees and wrote about the need for people to plant trees. In January, 1872, Morton proposed Nebraska designate April 10 as a day to plant trees. On April 10, 1872, Nebraska celebrated the first Arbor Day and planted about one million trees. In 1882, the date of Arbor Day was changed to April 22 -- Morton's birthday. Today, Arbor Day is celebrated on or around April 22.
>>Read about J. Sterling Morton
>>Read about Arbor Day
>>From Your Page: April 22, 2002

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July, 2002:
"Proclaim liberty throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof." - Inscription on the Liberty Bell. The Liberty Bell is located in Independence National Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
>>Read about the Liberty Bell
>>Visit Independence National Historical Park
>>Read about Independence Day in the U.S. (July 4)

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June, 2002:
"I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the republic for which it stands: one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all." -- The Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag. Did you know Flag Day is Friday, June 14, 2002? Flag Day was first celebrated on June 14, 1877. This was the 100th anniversary of the first U.S. Flag. In 1949, President Harry Truman signed legislation making Flag Day a day of national observance.
>>The American Flag is featured in our Reading Program
>>Read about the American Flag

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May, 2002:
"Knowledge itself is power." -- Francis Bacon (1561-1626). Bacon was a British philosopher and statesman. He helped develop the theory of scientific knowledge based on observation and experiment. Today, this theory is called the inductive method.

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April 29, 2002:
"Light this candle!" -- Alan Shepard in the book and movie, The Right Stuff. Shepard wanted the launch countdown to resume after waiting over four hours on May 5, 1961.
Alan Bartlett Shepard, Jr., was born on November 18, 1923, in East Derry, New Hampshire. Shepard graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, served in the Pacific during World War II, and became a Navy test pilot. On April 9, 1959, NASA announced Shepard was one of the seven original astronauts chosen for Project Mercury. The other six Mercury astronauts are: Scott Carpenter, L. Gordon Cooper, Jr., John H. Glenn, Jr., Virgil I. "Gus" Grissom, Walter M. Schirra, Jr., and Donald K. "Deke" Slayton.
Did you know President John F. Kennedy awarded Shepard the NASA Distinguished Service Medal for his Mercury flight?
Did you know Shepard logged a total of 216 hours and 57 minutes in space? Yes, 9 hours and 17 minutes of which he spent on the surface of the moon.
Alan Shepard died on July 21, 1998, at the age of 74.
>>Visit Alan Shepard's Photos & Links
>>Visit our NASA & Space Links
>>Browse our Extended Space Bookstore
Photo Credits: NASA

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April 22, 2002:
"Arbor Day which has already transplanted itself to every state in the American Union and has even been adopted in foreign lands... is not like other holidays. Each of those reposes on the past, while Arbor Day proposes for the future." - J. Sterling Morton (1832-1903). In 1854, Morton moved to Nebraska. He planted trees and wrote about the need for people to plant trees. In January, 1872, Morton proposed Nebraska designate April 10 as a day to plant trees. On April 10, 1872, Nebraska celebrated the first Arbor Day and planted about one million trees. In 1882, the date of Arbor Day was changed to April 22 -- Morton's birthday. Today, Arbor Day is celebrated on or around April 22.
>>Read about J. Sterling Morton
>>Read about Arbor Day

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April 15, 2002:
"The shot heard round the world." -- From the 1837 poem, The Concord Hymn, by Ralph Waldo Emerson. It refers to the first shot of the American Revolution fired on April 19, 1775. It is unknown who fired this shot. Battles broke out in Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts, between Colonial Minutemen and British Redcoats. These were the first battles of the American Revolution. In 1783, eight years later, the American colonies gained independence and the United States of America was born.
>>Read The Concord Hymn
>>Visit Minute Man National Historical Park
>>Celebrate Patriot's Day 2002 in Concord
>>Read about the American Revolution
>>Browse the American Revolution Bookstore

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April 8, 2002:
"With an unceasing admiration of your constancy and devotion to your country, and a grateful remembrance of your kind and generous consideration of myself, I bid you all an affectionate farewell." -- Last sentence of Robert E. Lee's "Farewell to the Army of Northern Virginia" on April 10, 1865. The previous day, Confederate General Robert E. Lee had surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia to Union Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House, Virginia.
>>Read about Robert E. Lee
>>Read about Ulysses S. Grant
>>Read about the Civil War
>>Visit Appomattox Court House National Historic Park

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April 1, 2002:
"E pluribus unum." This Latin phrase means "From the Many, One." This phrase is on the Great Seal of the United States, and it refers to how one unified country had been formed from thirteen colonies. Did you know it is also on U.S. currency?
>>Read about "E pluribus unum"
>>Read about U.S. Currency

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